Killing Son Of God A Branding Coup

The recent crucifixion of Jesus by the Romans has proven to be a marketing Midas touch for Judea, according to branding experts.

The brave effort of the Romans in nailing up the Son of God has captured the imagination of the entire province, and has seen Judea’s stocks riding high.

The unexpected success of the Romans in killing the Messiah has been one of the feel-good stories of the year, especially for those who viewed Jesus as a troublemaker and rebel.

“Brand Judea could never buy this kind of exposure,” said Aulus Junius, media strategist and marketing expert. Using an abacus he has conservatively estimated the financial windfall to the province from the killing to be as high as ten thousand denarii.

The news of the crucifixion spread quickly through the Roman Empire, into places like Parthia and Germany, where few had even heard of the plucky little province that defied God.

Publius Maxentius, a brand performance consultant, said the effort in killing the Christ projected an image of a “little province that makes a terrible difference.”

“Our governor was determined to stamp his will on the province, and that really connected with a lot of people,” he said. The exposure in some places, like Rome and Syracuse, where Judea seldom “gets a look in” would lead to “huge benefits” for the province, said Maxentius.

“Will it mean they respect our products and services more? It may.”

Maxentius is a well known figure in the marketing industry, and was the creative genius behind the famous “Eat grain – because if you don’t you’ll starve” campaign.

He says Judeans must now take advantage of the mass exposure given by the crucifixion.

“Killing this guy Jesus is going to go down in the ages, so it’s a big deal. But let’s not rest on our laurels. We need to be brave enough to take the next step. Slaughtering religious leaders is clearly something we’re very good at, and it’s something we can become world leaders in.

“It’s all about pushing forward Brand Judea. So let’s get nailing!

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